Hi Bush Blueberry

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Minimum Purchase:
25 units
Description:
Highbush Blueberries, Vaccinium corymbosum, are tall plants which can reach a height of 6-8 feet, with the berries being larger than lowbush blueberries, and produce more berries than the low bush.
Status: In Stock
$2.85
Here's how your plants will look on arrival. All plants are dormant with no leaves or foliage.
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Hi Bush Blueberry

Highbush Blueberry Plant
Description
The Highbush Blueberry plant is a popular North American shrub that produces delicious blueberries. This plant provides one of the major sources of blueberries for commercial use, and its fruit can be eaten raw, cooked, or even dehydrated. Blueberry plants are very versatile, and can be great for commercial use or to plant in the backyard to share with your neighbors and friends. The Highbush Blueberry grows from 6-12 feet tall, thus its name Highbush, and produces 1/4 to 1/2 inch blueberries. The white/pink flowers are clustered with 5 petals on each, and the plant flowers from February-June. It produces fruit roughly 60 days after flowering (April-October). This bush is pollinated by bees, and plants can spread from through the dispersion of seeds or by planting cut seedlings. Plants best produce fruit after 2 to 3 years of growth. Berries are ripe when they have turned from red to blue with no trace of the red left behind, usually 1-3 days after turning blue.Planting Instructions
Plant the Highbush Blueberry in full sunlight, and avoid planting in areas where strong winds occur. Plan to space plants 5 to 7 feet apart in rows 8 to 10 feet apart. Water immediately and continue to water regularly. Apply 4 inches of mulch around the base to contain water and protect the roots of the plant.

 

Maintenance
Highbush Blueberry plants need annual pruning to encourage growth and to produce higher volumes of fruit. Prune plants in winter months, cutting away dead or weak branches, and also branches that are beginning to grow too low. One branches reach 6 years of age, they have past their prime and can be trimmed away. One way to tell that branches are older is that the cane is turning or has turned gray, and the bark is beginning to peel off of the branches.