Are daisies annuals or perennials?

Are daisies annuals or perennials?

Annual vs perennial: what's the difference?

An annual is a plant that grows vegetation, flowers, goes to seed, and dies off in a single year.

True annuals die back every year, regardless of what climate or zone they have been grown in. Whereas some plants may be considered an annual in one zone but are actually a perennial in a warmer zone.

A perennial is a plant that grows vegetation, and flowers, goes to seed, and returns the following year. Woody perennials have woody stems that do not die back in the winter. Herbacious perennials have succulent vegetation that dies in winter but will regrow in spring.

Are Daisies Annuals or Perennials?

Yes, they are both!

Daisies are annuals in some zones and perennial in others. Most daisies are perennial in zones 5 to 9. A few varieties are hardy in zone 4. So in most zones, yes; daisies are perennial flowers.

In cooler zones, daisies can be grown as annuals or be brought indoors to overwinter.

Planting Zones

If you need help determining what your USDA growing zone is, go to our homepage. There you can type in your zip code, and we will tell you what zone is– no sign-up required!

Your zone is based on the daily high and low-temperature average in your area. It’s important to know your zone so your plants can have the best chance of surviving and thriving.

Types of Daisies

There are hundreds of varieties of daisies and many come from different families. The most typical daisy genus is Leucanthemum.

The most common and traditional daisies include:

  • Oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare) can be grown in zones 4 to 9
  • Shasta daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum) can be grown in zones 4 to 9
  • English daisy (Bellis perennis) can be grown in zones 4 to 9

Other daisies that are from different genera

  • Gerbera daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) can be grown in zones 8 to 10.
  • Marguerite daisy (Argyranthemum frutescens) can be grown in zones 10 to 11.
  • Painted lady daisies (Tanacetum coccineum) can be grown in zones 3 to 7

Daisy Symbolism

The daisy is one of the most recognizable flowers in the world. It symbolizes innocence, simplicity, and new beginnings. Because of its meaning, new mothers and children are gifted bouquets of daisies.

Daisies are a favorite among children and young adults who make flower crowns with them. Perennial daisies are essential in the timeless pastime of ‘he or she loves me, he or she loves me not.’

Daisies were also symbols of the flower-child generation in the 1970s. They were a prominent feature in the movie Harold and Maude (1971) and can be seen all throughout The Brady Bunch (1969-1974).

Growing Conditions

Common daisies require rich fertile soils in the range of 6.3 to 7.0 pH (parts hydrogen). Perennial daisies prefer soils that consist of organic matter and are well-draining. In hot climates and soils that are sandy or dry, the perennial daisy will need additional water.

Daisies can be planted in full sun. In warmer zones and in climates with extreme heat, perennial daisies will need occasional shade.

Daisies are easy to grow and require little maintenance to thrive. They can be grown in sandy soils and clay. They can be planted in containers, borders, and flower beds to give summer-long interest.

How to plant and take care of the daisy

Planting

  1. Scout the best location (full sun and workable soil)
  2. Dig a hole big enough to cover the roots but not too big that it will bury the stem
  3. Backfill the hole covering the roots, firm in the soil gently
  4. You can mulch, but it is not necessary. Mulching helps maintain moisture and serves as a natural fertilizer
  5. Water newly planted perennial daisies thoroughly to fill in any air pockets and to help it establish

Aftercare

  • Deadhead (remove dead flower heads) to encourage more blooming
  • Fertilize once a year in the fall (optional)
  • Divide the roots (in spring or fall) in future years to maximize blooming

How to Propagate Perennial Daisies

Daisies are one of the easiest plants to take care of, they practically take care of themselves. Occasionally, they may need to be divided to encourage blooms. Also, if you want more plants without having to gig, you can propagate them by seed

Division

  1. Dig up a clump of perennial daisies while trying to keep most of the roots intact
  2. Locate the crowns within the clump- these are where the stems come out together, if you are dividing a large clump, there will be several crown areas
  3. Tease apart roots from crown to crown
  4. Repot, plant them in another location, or containerize and give them away

Seeds

  1. Start seeds indoors in mid-March in warm, moist (not soggy) soil
  2. Once they begin to grow, put them in a slightly larger container
  3. When the frost is over, take them outside and set them in the shade for a day
  4. The next day, move them into part sun with some shade
  5. Day three or four, they can be planted
  6. Water thoroughly after planting

OR

  1. Let the plants self-seed or take their seeds and sow them elsewhere in the garden

Shop for Daisies Online

Here at Wholesale Nursery Co., we sell Oxeye Daisies and Shasta Daisies. We also offer other daisy-like perennial flowers that pair well with daisies. These include purple coneflower and brown eyed susans. Feel free to browse our selections of native, pollinator-friendly plants.

Oxeye Daisy

The oxeye daisy is one of the most iconic perennial plants in the US. What would summer be without this subtle treasure? Fortunately, it is easy to grow and is practically no maintenance. One plant can fill in a large bed over time or it can be grown in containers, the choice is yours.

Zones: 4 to 9
Sun exposure: Full sun
Mature height: up to 2½ feet
Water: Average to somewhat dry
Best for flower beds, children's gardens, borders, and containers

Check out our Oxeye Daisy product page here

Shasta Daisy

The Shasta daisy loves sunshine and should not be planted in the shade. It generally grows taller than the oxeye daisy. Fortunately, it is easy to grow and is low (or even no) maintenance!

Zones: 4 to 9
Sun exposure: Full sun
Mature height: up to 3 feet
Water: average
Best for flower beds, children's gardens, borders, and containers

Check out our Shasta Daisy product page here

Brown Eyed Susan

Brown-eyed Susans are similar to daisies in that they have a soil center and rays of petals. However, they have yellow petals with brown centers. They can grow in a range of soils and are excellent in filling in bare spots in the garden.

Zones: 3 to 9
Sun exposure: Full sun
Mature height: up to 3 feet
Water: average to moist
Best for pollinator gardens, borders, and cottage gardens

Check out our Brown Eyed Susan product page here

Purple Coneflower

The purple coneflower has a solid center with rays of purple petals. It is loved by pollinators and tolerates many soil types, including clay. It is easy to propagate and even easier to grow.

Zones: 3 to 9
Sun exposure: Full sun
Mature height: up to 3 1/2 feet
Water: average to moist
Best for pollinator gardens, borders, and cottage gardens

Check out our Purple Coneflower product page here

Whether you decide to plant daisies or plants that are similar, we hope you found this article helpful! Because daisies are perennial in most zones, you will be able to enjoy them for years to come.

Shasta Daisy

Shasta Daisy

Shasta Daisy is a drought-resistant perennial with abundant flowers that blossom from late spring through premature fall. These hardy plants make excellent cut or dried flowers and survive in full sun and partial shade. It is a perennial with green and divided leaves that stays low to the ground. In spring and early summer, it bears immense flowers in clusters that develop into flat oval seed pods. With proper care, it can become a staple in your garden. The plant can be propagated by seed. The seeds need light to germinate, so sowing them in a ground area that receives adequate sunlight is essential. Sowing The Seeds Of The Shasta Daisy Germination should occur about two weeks after the seeds are sown. You will see the green shoots popping up above the ground surface. The young sprouts should be transplanted into larger pots with space for growth and root development, which may occur two months after transplanting them from the seedbed site. To obtain the best results, it is recommended that the young plants be transplanted one foot away from the plants during the growing season. The plant will adapt to its new environment while providing fertilizer and water. Shasta daisy plants need regular pruning. This activity should be done frequently to avoid lumpy growth near the plant base. Proper pruning will allow light to circulate through the plant, provide more nutrients, and promote an optimum growth environment. Shasta Daisy Can Be Grown Indoors They can be grown indoors or outdoors. If grown outdoors, ensure that the plant receives adequate sun and a moderate amount of water. If grown indoors, place the pot near a sunlight source. The soil should be kept moist but not too wet or dry for the healthy growth of the plants. Shasta Daisy's Love Water  In addition, if the Shasta Daisy is grown in pots, water must be continuously applied to the soil. It would be best to mistreat the plants with water at least daily. Watering and fertilization should be done as often as necessary to keep the soil moist during the growing season, which is essential for plant maintenance.

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Oxeye Daisy

Oxeye Daisy

The Oxeye Daisy, typically called "daisy," is the classic white and yellow flower commonly seen in fields and gardens worldwide. Its yellow center and stark white surrounding petals evoke cheerfulness and serenity. The Latin name Leucanthemum Vulgare means "white flower," and it is typically used to represent patience. The Appearance Of Oxeye Daisy A medium-sized plant generally grows from one to three feet high and typically can be found with a thin stem and dark green leaves. The flower is small and dainty, adding elegance and whimsy wherever it blooms. The ray of petals surrounded by a bright yellow center evokes images of the sun. It resembles a smaller, more dainty version of a sunflower. It creates a great deal of pollen; this plant is top-rated in pollen production. Where To Plant Oxeye Daisy When grown wild, Oxeye Daisy is typically found in grasslands such as fields but can also be found in open forests and primarily other sunny areas. While this plant is native to Europe and certain parts of Asia, it also grows abundantly in North America. Oxeye Daisy Bloom Time Oxeye Daisy can be a perfect addition to any garden as long as one plants it in the proper conditions. They prefer damp soil and sun but can bloom in many different situations; it is quite a resilient flower. They bloom for a long time, from about late spring to autumn, so they have the potential to grace your garden all summer long. Another positive aspect of these plants is that they are perennials, so you won't have to worry about planting them yearly. When planted together in a large group or even a large field, the sprawling sight of many daisies together can be breathtaking.

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Brown Eyed Susan

Brown Eyed Susan

Brown Eyed Susan are North American native plants that thrive in the US Department of Agriculture zones 4-9. Their bright flowers bloom from mid to late summer for up to two months. Brown Eyed Susan's Colors Brown Eyed Susan flowerheads have 6 to 12 floret rays that bloom a bright yellow. The yellow petals surround a smaller circle of brown and black florets. This plant typically grows to be up to 5 feet tall. Its leaves are 4 inches long and 2 inches wide. Flowerheads grow to be ½ to 2 inches across.  Growing Conditions Of The Brown Eyed Susan They prefer mesic growing conditions. Although they grow well in loamy soil, they also do well in gravel and clay soil types. It desires full to partial sun but can stay in full bloom longer when planted in moderate shade. They have an average resistance to drought and tend to wilt like other flowers. Adding The Brown Eyed Susan To Your Landscape  Brown Eyed Susan is a short-lived perennial common in the Illinois area. It is widely associated with different parts of North America, as well. They typically grow wild in many prairies, meadows, fields, and roadsides. This biennial is taller and bushier than the Black-Eyed Susan and has many branches that extend from leaf axils. Many dark red stems of the plant grow, giving this plant its bushy look. Its leaves are ovate and rough to the touch. 1 to 2 flower heads grow on the upper stems of the plant. Flowers do not have a very pronounced smell. They are self-pollinators but attract many bee varieties seeking nectar and pollen.

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Purple Coneflower

Purple Coneflower

The purple coneflower is an excellent addition to any miniature garden that blooms in the summer and fall. This showy flower has a fibrous root system ideal for growing in different soil conditions. Also referred to as Echinacea Purpurea, this plant is drought, deer, and rabbit resistant.  Purple Coneflower's Features This herbaceous perennial is regularly used as a bordering plant due to its ability to propagate quickly. It's easily identified by its unique, showy arrangement of flowers. Each one of this beautiful plant's stalks will play host to a giant purple to pink hue flower. All flowers will have a spiny orange center and drooping petals. Purple Coneflower's Benefits Native to the central and southeastern portion of the United States, the plant is a delight for all types of gardens. It is commonly utilized in wooded areas and meadow-like expanses. This easy grower isn't prone to any serious diseases or pest infestations. Its sweet summertime nectar will attract an abundance of beautiful wildlife. Bees, hummingbirds, goldfinches, and other songbirds will all seek out this plant's nourishing seeds.  Purple Coneflower has a long-lasting bloom, providing a sweet color throughout most summer and fall months. A great cool-tone addition to any household garden, this robust plant will grow up to four feet tall and have a spread of between one and a half and two feet wide. A single healthy plant can showcase between 25 and 50 prominent flowerheads during its blooming season each year.  Purple Coneflower's Beauty Apart from its overly showy flowers, the Purple Coneflower has lance-shaped leaves with an altering arrangement. With a deep green hue, these leaves will feel sandpapery to the touch. Also sporting a green color, this plant's stems are round and hollow. They don't possess any woody substance like some other herbaceous plants do.

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